Tips to apply for a perfect student visa application

Tips to apply for a perfect student visa application
Photo: Vinta Supply Co., Pexels.

There is nothing surprising if you have selected Australia as a destination for your further studies. Australia is home to a lot of the world’s best universities and institutions. Not just the universities, it is the most developed nation in terms of technology and advancements. The study mechanism followed in Australia is the best and most affordable by the students appearing from different countries. The country has some of the best tourist attractions and for the international students, it is considered the most friendly and welcoming place where everyone can adjust no matter from which corner of the world they belong.

Once you know, what do you want to study for your higher education and from where in Australia, you tend to start thinking about the application process. When you want to file the application, some important factors need to be considered.

The selection of the right institution, to the various character and health requirements and the finances proofs. As it may seem a bit discouraging or difficult to fill a visa application, but if you follow the given points as suggested by the Migration Agent Adelaide, it would create greater chances of getting your visa application granted. If you have any further queries for student visa subclass 500, then you can check beneath mentioned details.

Tips to apply for a perfect student visa application
Photo: Anastasiya, Pexels.

Understanding the requirements

Before starting the process of making the application for a visa, you should be sure enough to be able to study in Australia and comply with the different requirements that need to be met. Some of those general requirements to fulfill and satisfy any of the student visa subclass 500 and other visas are:

Stability regarding finances: It is quite a basic requirement of any visa application for the purpose of visiting or studying in Australia that you need to prove to the Australian government about your financial position and need to state that you can very well afford your stay in Australia.

Academic Requirements: Some of the courses need to the fulfillment of certain grades in your academics to be able to enroll yourself into a course in Australia. The different institutions have different enrolment criteria.

English language competence: To be able to study in Australia, you need to have a good grip on the written and spoken the English language. This competence is also required to be proved to the Australian government through the various English language assessment provided by different providers.

The wise selection of institution

You can only gain access to a student visa if your selected institution is registered under CRICOS where CRICOS stands for Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students. This authority is simply a list of education providers where the overseas students are given enrolment, recruitment and taught. You should always opt for an institution which is registered under the CRICOS.

Assuring your chosen course complete the requirements

For gaining access to Australian student visa 500, you must be enrolled in a full-time course which is at least 3 months long. The level of education enrolled should be either of the following:

  • Higher-education tertiary course
  • Intensive English Language course
  • Post-graduate
  • Short course
  • Primary school or high school
  • Vocational education and training course

Application process research

The various institutions follow different requirements for applying to study in their institution. Hence, it is necessary to check whether you are following the right application process or not. It is recommended to check with your education provider before proceeding with the application.

Before applying for the visa, make sure you have your COE

If you are applying for a student visa 500, you must make sure you have received your COE (Confirmation of Enrolment) from the institution you have applied into. The application process for a visa requires the confirmation of your enrolment into a CRICOS registered institution.

Health checkup activity

Before applying for a visa, you need to get your health checkups done and get certified health insurance from a registered health insurance provider and Australian Government requires proof of complete health check examination while making an application for the visa.

Tips to apply for a perfect student visa application
Photo: Stanley Morales, Pexels.

Be ready with all the required documents

You should always be ready with the documents that the Australian Government had provided in its handy list to let you know about the requirement of each. Always keep your documents ready before applying for the visa application. The different and most important documents required for the visa application are the financial records, health insurance, English language requirements, and many others. Keep these documents handy with you while applying for the visa.

Revise the application

This is kind of very obvious thing which goes without saying. Once the application is completed, it should be revised again and again to check if any error is encountered before submitting the application. Revising the application repeatedly is an important part of the application process. This might save you from getting your visa application refused or rejected.

Preparing for the interview

Just as you prepare yourself for any job interview, be prepared for your visa interview as well. Below mentioned are a few things you should keep in mind while preparing yourself for the interview:

  • Read your application repeatedly to make sure you know every detail about your application.
  • You might be asked questions relating to your Statement of purpose, make sure you know what is written in your statement of purpose.
  • Make a thorough research of the questions you might be asked. Generally, the questions may be related to your reasons for selecting Australia as your destination for higher studies, reasons for selecting the particular course and institution, the relevance of your selected course with your future plans, etc.
  • Perform practice sessions of the interview with your family members and make yourself familiar with the answers to potential questions.
  • While in the interview, appear confident and perform well, as the immigration official will keep a watch on your attitude while the interview performance and will also judge you on the basis of your confidence.

These are the things our expert migration agent Adelaide suggests every applicant keep in mind to make sure they do not fail to follow while applying for the visa application.

SOURCEAAP:https://www.edministrate.com.au/wp-admin/post-new.php

Australia’s VET system set to shape our future workforce

The Morrison Government’s renewed commitment to the Vocational Education and Training (VET) sector will make it central to shaping Australia’s workforce for the future.

Speaking at the 28th National Vocational Education and Training Research Conference today, Minister for Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business, Senator Michaelia Cash, said she would lift the profile of Australia’s VET sector and aim to make it the first choice in post-school learning for millions of Australians.

“It is a valuable career choice for many Australians and should not be seen as being something less important than a university degree,” Minister Cash said.

More than 4 million people undertook vocational education and training in 2017. At the end of last year, there were more than a quarter of a million apprentices and trainees.

“We know that people with VET qualifications are highly regarded and sought after by employers, but we need more people to choose VET as their path to success,” Minister Cash said.

“The Morrison Government already has in place a number of programs and tools designed to increase the profile of the sector and encourage more Australians to choose a VET qualification.

“These programs will be especially important because, as our economy evolves and our workforce changes, VET will be the way we train and re-train the workforce of the future.

Minister Cash also delivered a message to education providers of the VET sector that more cooperation with industry was required to create better outcomes for students.

“Employers look to vocationally trained workers because of their suitability in skills and experience. Australia’s VET system must better connect with industry, respond to community needs, and have clear, consistent funding.

And with the growth in the VET sector, Minister Cash said there was always room for improvements.

“The sector still bears some of the scars of Labor’s mismanagement of bad student loans, underfunded courses, quality issues and the diminishing of TAFE.

“It is this Government’s promise to continue the hard work of reforming the sector, providing better quality courses, and better outcomes for trainees and employers.”

The Australian Government’s $525 million Delivering Skills for Today and Tomorrow package announced in the April Budget will also ensure that the sector can help supply Australia’s future workforce.

The package provides every Australian with the opportunity to grow the skills needed to succeed in an evolving workforce and, concurrently offers employers a pipeline of qualified workers they need to grow and prosper.

Minister Cash said the package reflects the Morrison Government’s commitment to growing the number of new apprenticeships.

“Under our landmark skills package, up to 80,000 additional apprenticeships will be created over the next five years in priority skill shortage areas, assisted by new apprenticeship incentives. Youth unemployment will be targeted with an offering of 400 scholarships in regional Australia to the value of $8 million.

“The Government is committed to creating more than 1.25 million jobs over the next five years and I’m confident that more and more of the people filling these positions will be coming to employers through the VET system,” Minister Cash said.

/Public Release. View in full here.

Minister praises vocational study over uni

Michaelia Cash
Minister Michaelia Cash hopes to raise the profile of the vocational education and training sector. (AAP)

Skills and Employment Minister Michaelia Cash wants Australian students to choose vocational training over university study when they finish school.

The federal government hopes Australian students will put their hands up for vocational education over university study.

Skills Minister Michaelia Cash will on Thursday address the vocational education and training sector at a conference in Adelaide, outlining the Morrison government’s aims for the field.

Senator Cash hopes to raise the profile of the sector to ensure it’s the first pick for students choosing their next steps after high school.

“It is a valuable career choice for many Australians and should not be seen as being something less important than a university degree,” she will say.

“We know that people with VET qualifications are highly regarded and sought after by employers, but we need more people to choose VET as their path to success.”

Senator Cash will also urge education providers to work closer with industry to ensure students receive better training.

“Employers look to vocationally trained workers because of their suitability in skills and experience,” she will say.

“Australia’s VET system must better connect with industry, respond to community needs and have clear, consistent funding.”

There were more than 250,000 apprentices and trainees at the end of last year, while more than four million Australians undertook vocational education and training in 2017.

Under the Morrison government’s $525 million plan, up to 80,000 extra apprenticeships will be created over the next five years in areas with skills shortages.

Youth unemployment in regional Australia will also be combated, with 400 scholarships on offer to the value of $8 million.

Turkey abolishes limit on international students numbers at universities

In what is being heralded as a positive step towards Turkey’s ambition of becoming an education hub, the country’s Council of Higher Education (YÖK) has announced that limitations on the number of international students accepted to study at Turkish universities have been abolished.

Prior to the announcement, universities could only accept international students if their total number did not exceed 50% of the overall student quota that each university defined annually for new admissions.

“The goal is to make Turkey a centre of attraction for higher education opportunities”

According to a report in the Daily Sabah medicine and dentistry courses will be the only exception where the 50% quota will still apply.

“However, universities with enough facilities to house a large number of students and meet criteria for education standards will be allowed to admit any number of students into these branches, providing a separate class for them,” the report stated.

Medicine and dentistry courses will be the exceptions where the 50% quota will still apply

YÖK president Yekta Saraç explained that the goal is to make Turkey “a centre of attraction for higher education opportunities”.

He pointed out that YÖK took the first steps to achieve this goal by setting up an international relations department and drafting a strategic plan for international efforts.

“I think we are conducting a successful process,” Saraç said, noting that Turkey signed deals with 34 countries since the 1980s in cooperation on education and to boost the number of students choosing Turkey for higher education.

“The recognition of our universities, especially in neighbouring countries, increased and we get good results from our initiatives to make Turkey more known for its universities in Africa and the Balkans.”

Saraç added that they have seen “a leap” in the number of international students. According to statistics released by YÖK last year, 125,138 international students were in the country in 2017-18.

“This is the result of serious planning… a new student and lecturer exchange program, updated accredited diploma regulations, new scholarships and initiatives to attract qualified foreign lecturers played a role in the increase,” Saraç added.

Speaking with The PIE News, vice director for Global Education and Partnerships at Istanbul Aydin University and coordinator of EURIE Ayse Deniz Ozkan noted that the lifting of undergraduate restrictions is expected to increase international student numbers overall.

In the past, when YÖK deregulated university admission criteria to allow institutions to set their own admission criteria, total international student numbers increased.

“Particularly foundation universities tend to take initiative and develop proactive marketing and admission policies when regulatory frameworks allow,” she said.

“Some may open more English-taught programs where the majority of the students will be international”

However, it is key that universities now develop the right internationalisation strategy to suit their individual institution.

“Some may open more English-taught programs, possibly where the majority of the students will be international,” Ozkan explained.

“We may see over-concentration of international students in certain study fields. These may create new challenges for university administrations.”

“It will be up to the universities themselves to navigate through this new era by setting the right admissions criteria and competitive tuition fees and by offering quality academic programs, and more services and support structures for international students,” Ozkan added.

SourceAAP:thepienews.com

Vocational reform threatens Māori education taonga

Vocational reform threatens Māori education taonga: Treaty of Waitangi claim

A contemporary Treaty of Waitangi claim filed on Thursday is further evidence of growing opposition to the government’s proposed Reform of Vocational Education, according to Skills Active Board member Des Ratima, who lodged the claim at the Waitangi Tribunal in Wellington.

The claim alleges that the rushed and inadequate consultation process for vocational reform has breached the Treaty, and was filed on behalf of Ratima himself and Skills Active’s 50% Māori shareholding. The claim also asserts that the inadequate consultation period and lack of engagement with the claimants has undermined the exercise of their mana and Tino Rangatiratanga over vocational education.

“Our claim asserts that the government has failed to recognise and provide for Māori taonga, namely vocational education; and failed to honour the principle of partnership under the Treaty,” says Mr Ratima, who last year was made an Officer of the NZ Order of Merit for his services to Māori over many decades.

“Each year, 22,500 Māori take part in industry training and reap the benefits of the ITO system,” Mr Ratima says.

“As kaumatua, we have a responsibility and a mandate to protect the interests of our rangatahi,” he adds.

Mr Ratima notes that Skills Active has achieved parity between Māori and non-Māori completions, something no other university or polytech has achieved.

“Māori will be disproportionately affected by Minister Hipkin’s proposed reforms – radical reforms that will completely overhaul vocational training in Aotearoa. So where is the evidence for dismantling the ITO system when it’s not broken, and it’s working for Māori?

“We are seeking a reasonable consultation period extended at least until the end of June, commensurate with the scope of this reform. And we wish to have some scrutiny of the government’s engagement with its Treaty partners in this reform.”

Mr Ratima says Education Minister Chris Hipkins has said recently in an answer to a Parliamentary Question that he has not received any negative feedback from Māori about the proposed vocational education reform – despite the many representations that have been made to him in person and in writing by individuals and representatives of hui.

“The Minister should be in no doubt that we believe these reforms will negatively affect Māorilearners. Government needs to embrace the concept of co-design from the outset, and by collaboration, produce mutually beneficial outcomes.” Mr Ratima said.

“Māori tenaciously hold to the ‘three Ps’ of the Māori-Crown relationship: Participation, Partnership and Protection. This reform offends all three.”

SourceAAP:

Paying back your HELP or HECS student debt, explained

An illustration shows a ball with "student debt" written on it chained to a person's leg to depict paying back HECS debt.

IMAGEWhile it might feel like a burden, taking on debt to study often pays off in the long run. But it’s important to understand the nature of the debt.(ABC Life: Luke Tribe)

So, buckle up: we’re going to go deep into world of the Higher Education Loan Program (HELP), which some of you might know by its former name, HECS. We’ll cover vocational education and training (VET) student loans too, which are part of the HELP program.

If you’ve been putting this off for a while, here’s your opportunity to tick off some life admin.

How student debt works in Australia

If you’re an eligible student in an eligible university course or vocational training program, you can access the Higher Education Loan Program (if you’re at university) or the VET student loan program (if you’re at TAFE or another vocational training provider).

When it comes to eligibility, there are a number of rules, but generally speaking you need to be an Australian citizen, hold a New Zealand special category visa or hold a permanent humanitarian visa. The StudyAssist website has a handy tool if you’re not sure whether you qualify.

HELP works like this:

  • Your tuition fees will be charged to your student debt immediately after the census date: a point in the study term when enrolments are finalised. (For university courses, it’s usually a few weeks into the semester.) If you’re enrolled in subject or course after the census date, you’ll rack up a debt for it — even if you don’t finish it (say you withdraw) or get your qualification.
  • You’re required to start paying back your debt once you earn above a certain amount. (For this year, it’s $51,957 before tax.) The more you earn, the more you’re required to pay back. You can also make voluntary repayments at any time. We’ll expand on this in detail soon.
  • When you earn enough to make repayments, they’ll be made through the tax system. If you’re an employee, some of your pay will be withheld by your employer to cover your repayments. (You don’t actually pay anything off until you file your tax return.) If you’re self-employed, you pay once you’ve filed your tax return.

Wondering how much debt you have? You can find out online (using the ATO service on MyGov) or by ringing the tax office on 13 28 61.

The difference between interest and indexation

While no-one likes debt, studying is usually a great investment because it can help you earn more income. University graduates, for instance, can earn more than $800,000 more than school leavers over a lifetime.

On top of that, there are two factors that make HELP debt more attractive than other loans. The first is that, unlike a loan for a car or a house, HELP debt doesn’t attract interest.

In other words, you don’t pay the government for the privilege of borrowing — which is a very good thing, says chartered accountant and independent financial adviser Stephanie O’Connor.

HELP debt is, however, “indexed to inflation”. Confused? It simply means that the debt is raised each year in line with the cost of living. Last year, the indexation rate was 1.9 per cent.

The second reason HELP debt is better than regular debt is that there’s no deadline to repay it. While you can’t avoid paying it once you earn enough money, you’re not forced to pay off the balance in a rush.

“If you owe the tax office money, you certainly don’t get those terms. The tax office will charge you interest, and they’ll want to collect the debt very quickly.”

How much will you repay?

The amount you have to repay is calculated as a portion of your income before tax. Here’s the repayment rates for the year to June 30, 2019.

SourceAAP:www.abc.net.au