Cash forgets workers involved in VET

Disgraced former Industrial Relations Minister Michaelia Cash today announced a panel to oversee reform in the vocational training sector.

The panel, ironically titled the “Industry VET Stakeholder Committee”, will have no representation for the people participating in the VET system.

It includes the Business Council of Australia, the Australian Industry Group, the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, major accounting firms KPMG and PwC as well as the Council of Small Business Organisations Australia, but no representatives of working people.

Budget cuts to TAFE, privatisation and a refusal by Liberal governments to listen to the needs of working people in the sector has created a serious skills shortage while leaving thousands of young people unemployed.

At the same time huge amounts of public money has been wasted on providers who rip off students and do not deliver the skills training we need.

This panel looks to be more of the same from a Government that will do anything to accommodate its big business donors.

As noted by ACTU Secretary Sally McManus:

“Excluding working people from a discussion about skills training is disappointing but not surprising from a government that caters exclusively to the interests of big business.

“The Morrison Government is pursing a policy agenda designed to keep wages low, attack the rights of working people and give even more power to big business.

“We need skills training which puts the needs of working people first and fills genuine skills shortages, not a system that pours money into the pockets of for-profit training providers.

“To fix the big problems in VET the Morrison government needs to listen to all stakeholders and act on their concerns. We call on the Morrison Government to include working people in this process.”

/Public Release. View in full here.

Vocational education reform Bill introduced

Legislation has been introduced in Parliament today that will create a unified and cohesive vocational education and training system and help New Zealanders prepare for the future of work, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said.

The Vocational Education Reform Bill achieves this by:

  • enabling workforce development councils to be established to give industry greater leadership across vocational education and training
  • establishing the New Zealand Institute of Skills & Technology to provide, arrange and support a range of vocational education and training, including on-the-job, face-to-face and distance delivery
  • providing for a smooth transition of functions and responsibilities from the current to the new system, and
  • establishing a new regulatory framework for vocational education and training.

“Industry-led Workforce development councils will provide skills leadership across the vocational education system. They will set standards and develop qualifications, endorse programmes developed by providers and advise the Tertiary Education Commission about the mix of vocational education and training needed for their respective industries,” Chris Hipkins said.

“The Bill will also establish a New Zealand Institute of Skills & Technology to provide, arrange, and support a range of education and training, including in the workplace.

“All 16 polytechnics and institutes of technology will become part of the Institute, as subsidiary companies initially. The Institute will continue the valuable role that institutes of technology and polytechnics currently have in providing foundation, degree-level and postgraduate-level education.

“The Bill includes a charter that will ensure the Institute will be responsive to the needs of all regions of New Zealand, their learners, industries, employers, and communities. It must offer a mix of education and training in each region, including on the job, face to face and distance delivery.

“And it must develop meaningful partnerships with industry, including Māori and Pacific employers, and with communities including hapū, iwi and Pacific communities.

“While the changes are significant, learners, staff and employers should be assured that the implementation and transition will be well managed and that we will continue to work with them through this transition process.

“The changes will come into force on 1 April 2020. There will be a transition period until 31 December 2022, to ensure continuity for learners and employers and to allow time to build new capacity.

“I encourage learners to enrol as they normally would in 2019 and 2020, including in apprenticeships and other multi-year programmes, and I encourage people in the workplace to keep training and employers to encourage more workers to sign up.

“Together, the changes introduced through this Bill will create a unified and cohesive system of vocational education and training, which will better serve our economy and all New Zealanders,” Chris Hipkins said.

“The select committee process will be a good opportunity to consider potential refinements to the legislation and the charter.”

The Bill is here.

/Public Release. View in full here.

ASQA Parliamentary Criticism Echo Sectors Concerns

The re gulator for the vocational education and training (VET) sector, the Australian Skills Quality Authority
(AS QA), has been criticised by Andrew Laming MP in a hard -hitting speech to parliament. According to the
Independent Tertiary Education Council Australia (I TECA), the peak body representing independent providers
in the higher education, vocational education and training sector, the v iews of Mr Laming echo those of most
quality independent providers in the VET sector.

Mr Lam ing ‘s speech canvassed the experience of many providers in dealing with ASQA. It highlighted how
award -winning RTOs are being accu sed of failing to meet regulatory standards for min or technical bre aches of
the l egislation or on matters that have no bearing on student quality such as the colo ur of a logo on a website.

ITECA encour ages all with an interest in t he challenges facing quality RTO ‘s to list en to the speech. It was
made in parliament on 31 July 2019 and can be found online at.

www. youtu.be/bNnwn5gY8OM
“The experience of many ITECA members can be found in Mr Lami ng’s comments. He ‘s drawn attent ion
to how ASQA ‘s app roach keeps good people running quality RTO s up at night,” said Troy Williams, ITECA
Chief Ex ecutive.

Mr Lam ing ‘s speech h ighlighted how many quality RTO ‘s face the wrath of ASQA for compliance issues that
ha ve little to no outcome on the provision of quality providing of training to s tudents.

“ITECA isn ‘t calling for the regulatory system t o be wound -back, s imply that the approach of ASQA be
modified to focus less on what Mr Lam ing c orre ctly called a dmi nistrivia,” Mr Williams said.

In his comments Mr Laming said “Ever y provider I spo ke to said that if there were to be another provider
engaged in fraud, mismanagement or irrespo nsible training practice of course they should be driven from the
training system “. ITECA supports this view without qualification.

The work of ASQA was consider ed in the report Strengthening Skills: Expert Review of Australia’s Vocationa l
Education and Training System autho red by Mr Stephen Jo yce and commi ssioned by the Australian
Government. ITECA believes this report sets a roadmap for reform that will help quality RT Os.

“ITECA and our members are supportive of the board direction set out in the Joyce report and we ‘re
comfo rted by the en gagement that we ‘ve had at a Ministerial and department al l eve l to assist the
government develop an appropr iate response,” Mr Williams sa id.

/Public Release. View in full here.

ASQA Parliamentary Criticism Echo Sectors Concerns

The re gulator for the vocational education and training (VET) sector, the Australian Skills Quality Authority
(AS QA), has been criticised by Andrew Laming MP in a hard -hitting speech to parliament. According to the
Independent Tertiary Education Council Australia (I TECA), the peak body representing independent providers
in the higher education, vocational education and training sector, the v iews of Mr Laming echo those of most
quality independent providers in the VET sector.

Mr Lam ing ‘s speech canvassed the experience of many providers in dealing with ASQA. It highlighted how
award -winning RTOs are being accu sed of failing to meet regulatory standards for min or technical bre aches of
the l egislation or on matters that have no bearing on student quality such as the colo ur of a logo on a website.

ITECA encour ages all with an interest in t he challenges facing quality RTO ‘s to list en to the speech. It was
made in parliament on 31 July 2019 and can be found online at.

www. youtu.be/bNnwn5gY8OM
“The experience of many ITECA members can be found in Mr Lami ng’s comments. He ‘s drawn attent ion
to how ASQA ‘s app roach keeps good people running quality RTO s up at night,” said Troy Williams, ITECA
Chief Ex ecutive.

Mr Lam ing ‘s speech h ighlighted how many quality RTO ‘s face the wrath of ASQA for compliance issues that
ha ve little to no outcome on the provision of quality providing of training to s tudents.

“ITECA isn ‘t calling for the regulatory system t o be wound -back, s imply that the approach of ASQA be
modified to focus less on what Mr Lam ing c orre ctly called a dmi nistrivia,” Mr Williams said.

In his comments Mr Laming said “Ever y provider I spo ke to said that if there were to be another provider
engaged in fraud, mismanagement or irrespo nsible training practice of course they should be driven from the
training system “. ITECA supports this view without qualification.

The work of ASQA was consider ed in the report Strengthening Skills: Expert Review of Australia’s Vocationa l
Education and Training System autho red by Mr Stephen Jo yce and commi ssioned by the Australian
Government. ITECA believes this report sets a roadmap for reform that will help quality RT Os.

“ITECA and our members are supportive of the board direction set out in the Joyce report and we ‘re
comfo rted by the en gagement that we ‘ve had at a Ministerial and department al l eve l to assist the
government develop an appropr iate response,” Mr Williams sa id.

/Public Release. View in full here.

ITECA – TAFE SA Partnership Heralds New Training Era In South Australia

The Independent Tertiary Education Council Australia (ITECA) represents independent providers in the higher
education, vocational education and training sectors. It has entered into a new agreement with TAFE SA that
is designed to foster collaboration bet ween independent and pubic providers of vocational education and
training (VET) and TAFE SA to support students get the skills they need to support a growing economy.

The agreement will see ITECA and TAFE SA working together through joint policy priorities, professional
development initiatives, closer liaison regarding the scope of delivery offered by providers and access for
independent providers to publicly owned resources.

“This is an important agreement that signals the intent of the ITECA membership and TAFE SA to provide
the workforce with the skills that the South Australian workforce will need into the future,” said Troy
Williams, ITECA Chief Executive.

Beyond looking at what type of training is most needed, the agreement also paves the way for independent
providers to use TAFE SA’s facilities to support the provision of courses.

“This innovative agreement will enable all education and training providers, both public and independent.

to complement each other ensuring maximum benefit from the expertise and resources available in the
VET sector. As a result, South Australia will obtain greater value from the increased use of taxpayer -funded
facilities with benefits going to those in training.” Mr Williams said.

The South Australia n Education Minister, John Gardne r MP, said that this agreement is an important step
that ensures government and industry are working together to deliver the workforce South Australia needs
in the future.

“South Australian students and employers are the biggest winners from this announcement, which will see
both organisations strive to better coordinate course offerings and ensure the needs of industry across the
state are being met,” Minister Gardner said.

The ITECA State Of The Sector Report shows that in 2019 there were of the VET students resident in South
Australia, 134,700 were with an independent Registered Training Organisation (RTO) and 52,1200 with
TAFE SA.

“Th ese student numbers highlight the importance of th e relationship between the ITECA membership and
TAFE SA in suppo rting the training and reskilling of South Australia. It’s an agreement that serves as a
model for what can be achieved nationally when independent providers and the public TAFE system look at
the student needs and develop collaborative approaches that pu ts them first,” Mr Williams said.

/Public Release. View in full here.

Time for a radical overall of nation’s skills funding system

The peak body representing independent higher education, vocational education and training providers is calling for radical reform of how the workforce is educated, trained and reskilled. The advocacy by the Independent Tertiary Education Council Australia (ITECA) is backed by new research that highlights the benefits of placing student choice at the centre of the funding model.

“In the years ahead Australia will face constraints as a result of not having a workforce with the skills required to meet the demands of a changing economy. The training system needs to support a culture of life‐long learning where constant reskilling is the norm. The challenge for governments Troy Williams, ITECA Chief Executive.

The 2019 ITECA State Of The Sector Report released this week provides the evidence required to overhaul the funding arrangements that underpin Australia’s vocational education and training system. The report highlights that, by virtually any measure, independent achieve outcomes equal to or better than public providers.

“We need one tertiary education funding model that supports students throughout their working lives and allows them to transit between the higher education and vocational education and training sectors. This will support a culture of life‐long learning,” Mr Williams said.

ITECA believes that present policy settings are unlikely to provide Australia with the skills needed to support an economy in which rapidly changing technology is the norm. The demands are such that vestment in workforce reskilling without the support of the independent tertiary education system that includes independent higher ing model that preferences the ECA.

“Policy settings must promote the complementarity of the public TAFE system and the independent vocational education and training system. Students should be able to select the quality provider of their choice – whether public or independent – and government funding models should be based on this approach,” Mr Williams said.

The 2019 ITECA State Of The Sector Report more than 60% of the 4.2 million students in vocational education and training. It notes that for domestic students it costs government $2,400 per student trained by independent providers in the vocational education and training system but $5,500 per student trained by public TAFE institutes.

l, where they can select the provider of their choice, whether they be a quality independent provider or public provider,” Mr Williams said.

/Public Release. View in full here.
SourceAAP:www.miragenews.com

Labor’s Free TAFE Policy – more jobs for Tasmanians, where we need them

Tasmanian Labor

  • Free TAFE policy for 5,000 Tasmanian careers
  • Key industries cannot find skilled Tasmanian workers
  • Liberal inaction has seen 2,000 apprenticeships vanish

 

A Labor Government would address unemployment while skilling-up the next generation of Tasmanian workers to have successful, lifelong careers in Tasmania.

Labor Leader Rebecca White said Labor’s $10 million free TAFE policy will provide 5,000 students the qualifications they need to find jobs in our fastest growing industries.

“Building, construction and hospitality businesses simply cannot find the qualified staff they need. They are flying in tradespeople and chefs from the mainland to fill the gap,” Ms White said.

“With Australia’s oldest population, and highest rate of disability, aged care and disability services face similar problems.

“There is a fundamental mismatch been Tasmania’s skillset and our growing industries. This mismatch is costing Tasmanians jobs and holding back our fastest growing industries.

“Under the Liberals, TAFE is broken and we have lost 2,000 apprenticeships.

“Labor will provide free TAFE courses across the building and construction, hospitality, aged care and disability services sectors.

“This means jobs for Tasmanians and a boost for our businesses.

“It means more apprenticeships and more traineeships. It means it will be easier for businesses to hire qualified staff and cheaper for tradespeople who take on apprentices. It means elderly Tasmanians will get the level of care they need.

“Labor has formed this policy directly from the feedback received from our Industry Advisory Councils – our industries want workers with the skills to match their demands so they can grow and provide careers to Tasmanians.

“The Liberals need to decide whether to back Labor’s policy and support 5,000 Tasmanians into meaningful careers or to continue to do nothing while mainlanders are flown in to plug skills shortages while Tasmanian apprenticeships disappear in their thousands.”

Labor will mandate that apprentices and trainees undertake at least 20 per cent of labour on government building and construction contracts.

This policy will also apply to the civil construction industry.

“Tasmanians looking for work should get the first chance at an apprenticeship or traineeship,” Ms White said.

Rebecca White MP

Labor Leader

/Public Release. View in full here.
SourceAAP:www.miragenews.com