Labor Pitches Skills And Digital Literacy Ahead Of Election

If elected on Saturday an Australian Labor Government will address Australia’s digital skills gap, establish centres of excellence for AI and blockchain, encourage more startup activity, and reform controversial encryption laws.

Each of the moves has been outlined by Shadow Minister for Human Services and the Digital Economy, Ed Husic, in the lead up to the federal election.

Today, Husic elaborated on several aspects of the Opposition’s digital strategy during an event in Sydney organised by InnovationAus and StartupAus. While Husic has become a regular at the town hall style gatherings LNP representatives have declined the group’s invitations, according to event organisers.

Skills Pitch

To address Australia’s digital skills gap Labor has pledged more vocational training for IT and more requirements that digital roles to be filled by local talent, with an emphasis on diversity.

Labor has promised 5,00 free Tafe places for IT and digital courses. Half of those places are reserved for women to address IT’s diversity problem. Today Husic revealed “where we can” the program would also target older workers transitioning to new roles in particular.

Husic said Labor would promote local talent in the digital economy but leave the door open for migrant workers to “ensure our skills are current”.

Shadow Minister for Human Services and the Digital Economy, Ed Husic speaking in Sydney. Supplied.

“We could fill every single vacancy here in Australia with a local and I’d still think there’s a role for skilled migration.

“From my point of view, if people are doing something smart somewhere else in the world and they want to come here or they’re needed here we should bring them here. Because we need to ensure that the knowledge base is continually replenished.”

Husic said Labor’s “smart visas” will mean foreigners with highly needed skills including digital can help bridge the deficit between local talent and industry requirements.

Businesses need to step up too, Husic argued, noting the practice of large corporations relying too heavily on 457 Visa holders for IT needed to stop.

Husic said a Labor Government would require large companies working on digital projects for government to ensure one in 10 of its involved employees are digital trainees or apprentices.

Labor’s shadow minister also reaffirmed the party’s commitment to reform the controversial encryption laws it helped pass late last year.

“This has been an awful bill in the way it has been put through parliament … This is having a devastating impact locally.”

Husic said several international firms are avoiding the Australian market because they believe storing data here is “not worth the risk”. Husic said Labor will push to reform the bill even if it remains in opposition.

However he ruled out repealing the legislation saying the challenge of bad actors misusing digital platforms was real and other jurisdictions were taking similar measures, although not as “hopelessly” as Australia.

Politicians Must Do Better On Tech: Husic

Regardless of which party wins government on Saturday Husic says a better understanding of technology is needed in Canberra.

“We’ve got a long way to go,” Husic said of politicians digital literacy.

“I think the reality is parliamentarians are going to have to get across [digital technology] a lot more. Not just in terms of the profound impact of technology broadly but even from a government perspective.”

Every government department will deal with transformation projects, Husic says, and the politicians leading them need to understand the underlying technology to some extent.

“Gone are the days that you could just be there for the announcement and shove the project management to the IT help desk and hope that it just all worked out. That’s not going to work anymore. We’ve seen that through this term of this parliament with a number of digital derailments, some of which have not purely been because of the tech … A lot of it is governance.”

SourceAAP:which-50.com

AI GROUP SKILLS, EDUCATION AND TRAINING STATEMENT

Innes Willox, Ai Group

Ahead of the coming federal election, Ai Group is releasing a series of policy papers on issues of importance to business and the community, including skills, education and training priorities.

“Education and training plays a critical role in the economy and the broader community both in addressing workforce skill needs and improving social inclusion,” Ai Group Chief Executive Innes Willox says. “The transformation of our economy is leading to skill mismatches and shortages due to the new tasks and jobs that are being created. Better skills alignment requires more regular skills forecasting to identify specific skills in demand.

“Critical shortages exist for Australia’s STEM workforce. Ai Group calls for measures to grow and strengthen our STEM-qualified workforce through a national STEM skills strategy led by government and industry. Ai Group is helping to address this gap through its Industry 4.0 Higher Apprenticeships Program, which provides a key platform for the delivery of workforce skills through an employment-based learning program.”

He says that businesses require more support for workforce planning, and industry requires access to programs that are flexible in length and mode in both the VET and higher education sectors.

“With literacy and numeracy levels a constraint on business effectiveness, Ai Group urges the funding, development and promotion of a national workforce language, literacy and numeracy strategy and program, developed in partnership with industry. The program must incorporate the development of digital literacy skills.

“Australia’s youth unemployment rate is concerningly high. Increased investment is needed in transition programs that equip individual young people with the right skills to enable them to enjoy greater opportunities and to more fully participate in the workforce and the community.

“Australian industry needs its apprenticeship system to grow. A number of measures are needed for it to sufficiently meet industry’s needs, including a national body to oversee the system.”

Ai Group has also called for a more coherent and connected tertiary education sector and recently released a paper Realising Potential: solving Australia’s tertiary education challenge.

SourceAAP:www.industryupdate.com.au