Morrison Government’s ‘anti-worker agenda’ ignores unions in VET program

Senator Michaelia Cash announces new Industry VET Stakeholder Committee, which does not include workers or unions (Screenshot via YouTube)

‘One has to wonder if the money funding the VET reform program is actually being applied to real reform of the program itself.’

Craig Robertson, CEO TAFE Directors Australia 

Employment Minister Michaelia Cash outlined reform plans within the VET program in a $525 million Morrison Government project, while announcing the formation of the Industry VET Stakeholder Committee on September 26.

While the Morrison Government seeks to reform the Vocational Education and Training sector (VET) – a key component of the TAFE education program – the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) contends those actions are being performed with a bias heavily slanted towards big business and employer groups.

The ACTU points out that among groups represented on the VET committee, the voices of those who ultimately benefit in the way of training and jobs are not being consulted: workers’ groups and union members themselves.

So this is where we are now.
Michaelia Cash dismissing the value of university education & denigrating VET teaching in another stupid slogan👇🏼

As if you don’t learn in VET, and as if you don’t earn from a university degree.

View image on Twitter

And to officials in the organisation overseeing the union movement in Australia, it’s not just that they feel ignored in the consultation process within the committee and the decision-making process, but that it may have been purposely done as a typical Liberal Party pro-business, anti-worker agenda.

The committee – which will convene once a month effective immediately until mid-2023 – contains officials from organisations among its 19 members such as accountancy firms Price Waterhouse Coopers and KPMG to business lobby bodies Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the Australian Industry Group, and the Business Council of Australia.

And eight of the 19 officials represented are CEO’s of various pro-business organisations, and almost all of the officials on the committee are leaders of their respective organisations.

The ACTU said in a statement:

‘This panel looks to be more of the same from a Government that will do anything to accommodate its big business donors.’

The ACTU and its affiliated union groups also cite the budget cuts and privatisation moves by the Abbott/Turnbull/Morrison Government since 2013 – actions seen as not just debilitating to the TAFE system, but ultimately anti-worker tactics in general – as precursors to the Coalition’s current VET reform agenda.

Exclusive: ACTU secretary Sally McManus wrote to Scott Morrison calling for him to overturn unions being sidelined from the VET industry panel. https://thewest.com.au/politics/unions-fuming-over-training-panel-snub-ng-s-1971353  @AAPNewswire

Unions fuming over training panel snub

ACTU president Sally McManus has written to Scott Morrison criticising the decision to leave unions out of a panel to guide training reform.

“Excluding working people from a discussion about skills training is disappointing but not surprising from a Government that caters exclusively to the interests of big business,” said Scott Connolly, the ACTU’s assistant secretary.

The ACTU and its affiliated groups also possess the view that the Coalition’s moves on the TAFE system since 2013 have resulted in shortages of skilled workers across a variety of industries.

Shadow Education Minister Tanya Plibersek agrees with that view and backed it up with statistical evidence in August:

We see about 150,000 fewer apprentices today than when the Liberals first came to government. We’ve seen billions cut from TAFE and training and apprenticeships.  Employers are saying it’s hard to find skilled staff, at the same time as we have unemployment, underemployment and high rates of temporary migration.

The lack of focus on the human element of consultation also appears to exist as just one apparent shortcoming of the planned reforms of the VET program at present.

We’ve got skills shortages right across Australia because of the Liberals’ failure to invest in TAFE and training. This is a brake on our economy. Because when you lock someone out of education, you’re locking them out of a job.

Embedded video

Of the $525 million committed to raising apprenticeship numbers within the VET program, as announced in last April’s Federal Budget, TAFE Directors Australia – incidentally, one of those groups on the VET Stakeholders committee – said that $70 million of that funding is new and the remainder has been taken from unused funds that were previously earmarked for Victoria and Queensland, in previous budgets for similar programs.

And just by paying attention to the sage words of TAFE Directors Australia’s own CEO, Craig Robertson, one has to wonder if the money funding the VET reform program is actually being applied to real reform of the program itself.

“Only $200 million will be incentives to employers to take on new apprentices. It is good to introduce incentives, but its a sad state we’re in when we are relying on incentives to get employers to take on apprentices,” said Robertson.

Moreover, the VET reform package of proposals has allowed for a five-year plan to raise the numbers of apprenticeships by 80,000 places in occupations facing shortages including bakers, carpenters, bricklayers and plumbers.

But even if those plans are successful, that still fails to accommodate for projected apprenticeships and potential jobs that have been lost since 2013.

Yet Cash has defended the reforms defining the program. “Our vision to create a strong VET sector is critical to our economy and to helping prepare Australians for the workforce of today and the future,” said Cash.

Moreover, for a Government which uses the Australian Bureau of Statistics employment definition of anyone who works as little as an hour per week as being “employed” to inflate its claims of employment growth being greater than what it actually is, it is also counting on other programs to fill the gaps on long-term employment.

‘The Morrison Government is committed to creating more than 1.25 million jobs over the next five years and I’m confident that more and more of the people filling these positions will be coming to employers through the VET system,’ said Cash.

‘We are acutely aware of the workforce requirements in the Australian economy. Our reform agenda will deliver better outcomes for Australians who make the choice to pursue a VET pathway,’ she added.

And yet, Cash has talked around the assertion about workers’ groups, from unions and otherwise, taking part in the reform consultation process:

“Together we will improve the VET system through collaboration of Commonwealth, state and territory governments, industry and training providers, and shift community perceptions around industry-focused training.” 

And Connolly remains defiant to Cash’s plans on the reform program, insisting that workers’ groups need to be a part of that process:

We need skills training which puts the needs of working people first and fills genuine skills shortages, not a system that pours money into the pockets of for-profit training providers…

…To fix the big problems in VET, the Morrison Government needs to listen to all stakeholders and act on their concerns. We call on the Morrison Government to include working people in this process.

If that fails to occur, then the benefits to TAFE students and those who enrol in the VET program will be negligible, if not debatable altogether.

More Liberal lies. @ScottMorrisonMP says They will skill up Australia with its apprentice program. They have cut $3b from vocational education presided over 150,000 less apprentices and ignored investment in TAFE. I call on Michaelia Cash to debate me on our respective policies.

William Olson was a freelance journalist from 1990-2004 and hospitality professional since late 2004. You can follow William on Twitter @DeadSexyWaiter.

Scott Morrison slammed: Unions fume over training panel snub

ACTU Secretary Sally McManus told the prime minister that unions had a long history of positive engagement with the sector, including on training design and delivery.ACTU Secretary Sally McManus told the prime minister that unions had a long history of positive engagement with the sector, including on training design and delivery.

Unions are urging Scott Morrison to overturn a decision to sideline them from a panel overseeing the government’s plan to boost vocational education and training.

Skills Minister Michaelia Cash has announced a 19-member panel to guide the $525 million reform package.

The panel will include the Business Council of Australia, the Australian Industry Group and the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

But Australia’s peak union body will not be included.

In a letter obtained by AAP, ACTU Secretary Sally McManus told the prime minister that unions had a long history of positive engagement with the sector, including on training design and delivery.

“We are aware of the current weaknesses of the VET system and have for many years attempted to address those issues, often in concert with many of the organisations Minister Cash has included on the Industry VET Stakeholder Committee,” she wrote.

Ms McManus said shutting out the voice of workers was ill-advised and represented the squandering of an opportunity to address real weaknesses in the system.

Senator Cash said the ACTU showed contempt for the Joyce review, which recommended forming the panel, making it hypocritical to want to be involved.

“Sally McManus’ letter is nothing but a collection of hollow words,” she told AAP.

“The fact is unionism under Sally McManus has become more and more irrelevant in today’s economy. Representation has plummeted.”

The skills minister pointed to the ACTU’s submission to the review which called it a political charade.

“Only the Morrison government is focused on fixing the rorts and rip-offs left under Labor.”

Ms McManus told AAP the decision to exclude unions and the prime minister’s refusal to overturn it was deeply disappointing.

“The creation of a new committee without union representation is an outrageous move by a minister with a long history of attacks on working people,” she said.

“Minister Cash has a long history of doing whatever it takes to serve the interests of big business and erode workers’ rights.”

Sourceaap:https://www.qt.com.au/news/unions-fuming-over-training-panel-snub/3845574/

Unions fuming over training panel snub

ACTU's Sally McManus wants government to include unions in a panel overseeing vocational training
ACTU’s Sally McManus wants government to include unions in a panel overseeing vocational trainingCredit: AAP

Unions are urging Scott Morrison to overturn a decision to sideline them from a panel overseeing the government’s plan to boost vocational education and training.

Skills Minister Michaelia Cash has announced a 19-member panel to guide the $525 million reform package.

The panel will include the Business Council of Australia, the Australian Industry Group and the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

But Australia’s peak union body will not be included.

In a letter obtained by AAP, ACTU Secretary Sally McManus told the prime minister that unions had a long history of positive engagement with the sector, including on training design and delivery.

“We are aware of the current weaknesses of the VET system and have for many years attempted to address those issues, often in concert with many of the organisations Minister Cash has included on the Industry VET Stakeholder Committee,” she wrote.

Ms McManus said shutting out the voice of workers was ill-advised and represented the squandering of an opportunity to address real weaknesses in the system.

Senator Cash said the ACTU showed contempt for the Joyce review, which recommended forming the panel, making it hypocritical to want to be involved.

“Sally McManus’ letter is nothing but a collection of hollow words,” she told AAP.

“The fact is unionism under Sally McManus has become more and more irrelevant in today’s economy. Representation has plummeted.”

The skills minister pointed to the ACTU’s submission to the review which called it a political charade.

“Only the Morrison government is focused on fixing the rorts and rip-offs left under Labor.”

Ms McManus told AAP the decision to exclude unions and the prime minister’s refusal to overturn it was deeply disappointing.

“The creation of a new committee without union representation is an outrageous move by a minister with a long history of attacks on working people,” she said.

“Minister Cash has a long history of doing whatever it takes to serve the interests of big business and erode workers’ rights.”

sourceaap:https://7news.com.au/politics/unions-fuming-over-training-panel-snub-c-485743

Training Next Generation Of It Talent In Victoria

More tech talent will be available to help develop a stronger pipeline of qualified and experienced tech talent, thanks to the Andrews Labor Government.
Minister for Jobs, Innovation and Trade Martin Pakula today visited RMIT to announce that the Labor Government will invest $200,000 to expand the Microsoft Traineeship Program to Victoria.
Australia currently faces a shortfall of 100,000 workers by 2024 in the information and communications technology sector, with the number of people graduating with degrees in this area not enough to meet demand.
The Microsoft Traineeship Program provides trainees with industry-recognised credentials such as a Certificate IV in Information Technology while they undertake paid, hands-on learning with some of Australia’s biggest companies.
In Victoria, program partners include: Coles, CompNow, MEGT Australia, Modex, Blue Connections, Thomas Duryea Logicalis, Advance Computing and Datacom. Trainees are not required to have a background in IT and can be at any stage in their career.
The course is suitable for those with an interest in IT including school leavers, recent graduates, those looking to change careers, women returning to work, people from Cultural and Linguistically Diverse backgrounds, Indigenous people and people living with a disability.
Victoria is Australia’s tech city and an emerging tech hub in the Asia-Pacific, and the Andrews Government is determined to ensure the state remains a leading location for the tech industry.
The Labor Government is investing record funding in training and skills and higher education to make Victoria the Education State. Since 2015, more than $1.3 billion has been invested to rebuild our TAFE system and ensure students can get the skills they need for the jobs they want.
As noted by Minister for Jobs, Innovation and Trade Martin Pakula
“Through this program, we are investing in the next generation of IT professionals, ensuring they have the skills and real-world experience to forge ahead in their careers.”
As noted by Minister for Training and Skills and Higher Education Gayle Tierney
“Partnerships like this one between employers and training providers are critical to ensuring our students get relevant training and on-the-job experience.”
As noted by Microsoft Australia Managing Director Steven Worrall
“With support from the Government – as well as a network of local partner and customer organisations – we aim to create a new pipeline of exceptional IT talent and create exciting career opportunities for aspiring trainees.”
/Public Release. View in full here.

SOURCEAAP:https://www.miragenews.com/training-next-generation-of-it-talent-in-victoria/

Regional focus for foreign worker visas

Skills minister Michaelia Cash says the skilled migrant jobs list for regions is under review.
Skills minister Michaelia Cash says the skilled migrant jobs list for regions is under review.

An overhaul of the list of jobs Australia needs migrants to help fill will aim to get more locals into apprenticeships and more immigrants into regional areas.

The Morrison government has started its regular review of the skilled migration occupation list and wants to hear from people in regional areas in particular about what job vacancies they can’t fill.

The fresh look at the list of jobs people can get temporary visas for builds on a separate review announced last week to examine which trades have the worst skills shortages.

“Skilled migration has always been a part of this country’s prosperity, but we need to ensure we are getting the right skilled migrants filling the skills shortages,” Employment and Skills Minister Michaelia Cash said on Wednesday.

“We have heard from stakeholders who have identified a growing need in some sectors for skilled workers.”

The top areas for employed foreign workers in 2018/19 were in the IT sector, and for university lecturers, management roles, chefs and doctors, figures from the employment department show.

While there is a separate occupations list for regional areas, details of those employed in the regions were not made available.

The number of skilled visas in recent years has been around 85,000, but this dropped significantly in 2017/18 to 64,500, before rebounding last financial year.

Immigration Minister David Coleman said the government had a special focus on skills shortages in regional areas across its whole migration program and would continue to make sure businesses could get the workers they needed to grow.

“We’ve allocated 23,000 regional migration places, introduced two new regional visas and signed designated area migration agreements around the country to attract migrants to the regions, help towns grow and to fill some of the 60,000 job vacancies in regional Australia,” he said.

An updated skilled migration occupation list will be published in March 2020.

The existing lists make about 500 occupations eligible for temporary skilled visas and 673 jobs eligible for the regional sponsored migration scheme.

sourceAAP:https://thewest.com.au/politics/regional-focus-for-foreign-worker-visas-ng-s-1965300

Industry views sought on skills needs list

Federal Employment Minister Michaelia Cash has launched a review of the National Skills Needs List.
Federal Employment Minister Michaelia Cash has launched a review of the National Skills Needs List.

Businesses are being asked for their advice on which trades are experiencing a skills shortage, in order for the federal government to better target new training support.

Employment Minister Michaelia Cash has launched a review of the National Skills Needs List, before making available a revamped skills shortage payment for businesses to take on an apprentice or trainee or up-skill current staff.

“The review will ensure skills shortages are identified using a forward-looking, up-to-date methodology and that apprenticeship incentives are targeted at addressing critical skills shortages in the Australian economy,” Senator Cash said.

The government is in the process of overhauling the vocational education and training sector, putting a $525 million skills package on the table.

The existing broad range of incentive payments are set to be streamlined from July 1, 2020.

The 65 occupations that currently comprise the National Skills Needs List encompass around 90 per cent of trade-based Australian Apprenticeships, but have only been updated once since the system was introduced in 2007.

Changes in the economy and a booming demand for new infrastructure have meant the list is not keeping up with the needs of business and industry.

Submissions on the Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business’ issues paper close on September 20.

SOURCEAAP:https://thewest.com.au/politics/industry-views-sought-on-skills-needs-list-ng-s-1964143

Industry views sought on skills needs list

Federal Employment Minister Michaelia Cash has launched a review of the National Skills Needs List.
Federal Employment Minister Michaelia Cash has launched a review of the National Skills Needs List.

Businesses are being asked for their advice on which trades are experiencing a skills shortage, in order for the federal government to better target new training support.

Employment Minister Michaelia Cash has launched a review of the National Skills Needs List, before making available a revamped skills shortage payment for businesses to take on an apprentice or trainee or up-skill current staff.

“The review will ensure skills shortages are identified using a forward-looking, up-to-date methodology and that apprenticeship incentives are targeted at addressing critical skills shortages in the Australian economy,” Senator Cash said.

The government is in the process of overhauling the vocational education and training sector, putting a $525 million skills package on the table.

The existing broad range of incentive payments are set to be streamlined from July 1, 2020.

The 65 occupations that currently comprise the National Skills Needs List encompass around 90 per cent of trade-based Australian Apprenticeships, but have only been updated once since the system was introduced in 2007.

Changes in the economy and a booming demand for new infrastructure have meant the list is not keeping up with the needs of business and industry.

Submissions on the Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business’ issues paper close on September 20.

SOURCEAAP:https://thewest.com.au/politics/industry-views-sought-on-skills-needs-list-ng-s-1964143

Scott Morrison’s TAFE for the rich

(Caricature courtesy Bruce Keogh / keoghcartoons.com.au)

The Coalition Government’s policies have starved TAFE in favour of private-sector VET training, effectively making it an educational option only for the rich., writes Leisa Woodman.

Affordable, practical education through Technical and Further Education (TAFE) is part of the Australian consciousness in a way that many may not even realise.

Quality materials and competent workmanship have long been taken for granted in our society, and Australians have for generations been creatively stimulated by the secure knowledge that their educational journey is never over.

Even if one had been coerced into an unsuitable degree, or dropped out of high school, there was still a way back into learning through TAFE.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has mysteriously declared he wants to “raise the status” of TAFE courses in Australia, saying they are “as good as uni”.  He has revealed that “reform” of the vocational education sector would be at the forefront of the agenda at the Council of Australian Governments meeting in Cairns. Australians should rightly demand of the Prime Minister, whether this plan for reform is going to address how TAFE has morphed in recent years into what one teacher termed, “education for the rich”.

VocEdAustralia@VocEdAustralia

GoogleVET:PM declares ‘TAFE is as good as uni’ as vocational training placed on COAG agenda – The New Daily https://ift.tt/2YRGOaj 

PM places TAFE, vocational training on COAG agendaPrime Minister Scott Morrison has declared “TAFE is as good as university” and in many cases pays better, before COAG talks begin in Cairns on Friday.

The full fees payable for many diplomas are now comparable to university fees. While each student is allowed two chances at accessing government-subsidised study before having to pay the full fees, even these subsidised courses cost many thousands of dollars. Fees are payable upfront in the case of certificates, that don’t allow deferred Vocational Educational and Training (VET) loans. What working-class person has thousands sitting around handy? According to the TAFE educator, students manage to pay these fees if “they have benefactors”.

TAFE proudly advertises that students can access fees by instalment, but when a student enquires about this scheme, they are informed they must allow for $80 to $90 left in their bank after repaying their fortnightly fee contribution, which could be $70 dollars or more. A simple calculation reveals this is impossible if living out of home, on any government payment.

To make matters worse, many TAFE diplomas now have prerequisites for entry — meaning a student may exhaust their two subsidised courses by the time they get to the course they really want to do.

Scott Morrison may have declared that ‘TAFE is as good as university’, but Australia is a long way from having policies that support students equitably across the tertiary education system. By @andrewjnorton https://grattan.edu.au/news/the-rewards-of-vocational-education-need-to-be-better-known/ 

The rewards of vocational education need to be better known

Prime Minister Scott Morrison may have declared that ‘TAFE is as good as university’, but Australia is a long way from having policies that support […]grattan.edu.au.

Fees also differ wildly from one state to the next. A Diploma of Building and Construction costs $37,168 at TAFE South Australia, but under Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews’ progressive TAFE policy, is free to the unemployed in Victoria. One can imagine the few remaining prospective students not excluded by the cost being perturbed by the instability and so, it seems, student numbers are down across campuses.

There is a chance for the Federal Government to address a real problem. Many employers in technical fields, such as pathology, are now asking for university degrees for no reason other than that so many have them. The result of people choosing universities, who probably should have attended TAFE institutions, is that degrees have lost their value in the labour market. Some entry positions now, in reality, favour a master’s degree, which, mostly uncovered by Austudy, is also only accessible to the rich.

To attract students back to TAFE, employers must begin to see education as a set of suitable skills, rather than a spending competition. However, this is an ethos directly in competition with the goals of our present Coalition Government.

It has long been the policy of the Coalition to effectively “starve” TAFE in favour of the private sector of VET training, ripping out $3 billion in funding in the past six years. One suspects that Morrison’s plan to raise the status of TAFE will simply be a language project designed to justify the now prohibitive costs at disastrously underfunded campuses.

TAFE cannot be revitalised with words. Only a sustained injection of funds to TAFE can end predatory Registered Training Organisations and restore technical education to its rightful place in assisting Australians from all backgrounds to gain, diversify and upgrade their skills easily throughout their lives.

You can follow Leisa Woodman on Twitter @LeisaWoodman.

Adam Curlis@TAFEeducation

@GladysB and @ScottMorrisonMP seem to be singing from the same hymn sheet. After years of funding cuts & neglect, why the sudden interest in TAFE?

What exactly have they got planned for our public TAFE system? https://twitter.com/TAFEeducation/status/1162174463489609728 

“I have always had a vision universities & TAFEs have to work much more closely together & the diversification of our economy & … having that fed back to me from the companies I am meeting” I am intrigued ⁦⁩. Which companies?

SOURCEAAP:https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/scott-morrisons-tafe-for-the-rich,13020

Nation needs skills to bust traffic jams

You could practically hear the groans from commuters across the country at the news the cost of congestion could double in the next 15 years if nothing is done.
That’s just what Australians need: more time wasted in traffic jams and overcrowded trains and buses.
And the nation’s infrastructure gurus have warned there needs to be at least $200 billion committed to the nation’s roads, public transport, utilities, schools, hospitals and so on every five years if we’re to have any hope of getting on top of the problems.
But, as Infrastructure Australia’s boss said when releasing the report, traffic jams and overcrowded public transport are just the most visible aspect.
The problem is complex and a skills shortage is a big part.
You can promise hundreds of billions of dollars for as many congestion-busters or transport “mega-projects” as you like, but you still need someone to build them.
And once you’ve found enough people to plan, design and build all the roads and railways needed, you need people to drive the trains, work the signals, and maintain the facilities.
“At all levels and for all types of infrastructure, access to appropriate skills is a problem,” the Infrastructure Australia audit states.
Or, as Napoleon Dynamite kinda said, we don’t even have any skills – truck driver skills, engineer skills, surveyor skills, tunnelling skills, electricity linesmen skills.
It’s a combination of factors: unprecedented levels of construction (but levels Infrastructure Australia says will have to be the new normal), an ageing workforce and dropping numbers of young Australians starting a career in these areas.
Take the railway workforce, for example.
Demand for skills across all areas, from drivers to signalling technicians, is expected to rise by more than five per cent over the next five years.
But at the same time, 20 per cent of rail workers are expected to retire.
The latest figures on apprenticeships show the number of people starting training is the lowest in two decades and completion rates are also at long-term lows.
And it’s a trend. Commencements have been dropping since about 2012, and completions declining since 2014.
Labor says the federal government should invest billions of dollars in the nation’s TAFEs as well as its roads and rail.
“We’ve got 150,000 fewer apprentices and trainees today than when Labor left government,” education spokeswoman Tanya Plibersek said.
“If you lock people out of education, you are locking them out of a job.”
Infrastructure Australia noted the lumpy pipeline of big projects, saying it “hinders the ability of industry and government to manage workforce capacity and skills effectively”.
It singles out the Sydney Metro project as a good example of planning ahead for workforce needs.
The NSW government worked with TAFE in the state to start training workers for the driverless rail line ahead of its construction.
When it announced the specialised infrastructure skills centre back in 2017, Sydney Metro anticipated more than 500 entry-level employees would be trained there over five years in courses tailored to address critical skills gaps.
Political leaders are not deaf to all these warnings.
But the pace of action can be slow, particularly when all players in the federation need to get on board.
In its answer to the calls for action on the skills crisis last week, the Council of Australian Governments essentially decided to plan to have a plan.
The Business Council of Australia has been campaigning for nearly three years to boost the standing of training, calling for universities, TAFE and vocational education to be put in the same policy and funding bucket.
A good sign now is the rhetoric Prime Minister Scott Morrison is using around rebuilding confidence in vocational education and encouraging people to see it as a genuine option.
“TAFE is as good as uni,” he declared.
“I want mums and dads to be confident about the choice of their kids for a trade, for a technical or skills-based education. It is not second prize.”
Community attitudes must change if Australia is to have enough workers with the skills to build all the roads, rail and other infrastructure he’s promised to get people out of those traffic jams.

Morrison Government faces backlog of problems

Prime Minster Scott Morrison has a hefty to-do list. Picture: AAP Image/Brian CasseySource:AAP

ANALYSIS

The Coalition government of Scott Morrison has been tied down since the May 18 election by the urgent need to fix serious problems it has inherited.

That is, inherited from itself.

The latest sign of this is the review of the National Disability Insurance Scheme launched today by minister Stuart Robert.

But the to-do repair list is much more extensive, and includes, water policy, aged care and education.

The NDIS review is merely one instance of the Coalition needing to fix matters that have been under its care for more than half a decade.

By September 18, the Coalition will have been in office for six years. Mr Morrison has been in cabinet all of that time, four of the six years either as treasurer or prime minister.

If Mr Morrison wants to blame anyone for shoddy or tardy work, he would have to be among the culprits.

There are several other instances of overdue repairs beyond the NDIS review.

One of the biggest is the royal commission into aged care, which will uncover case histories most voters will find shocking and will worry the growing voter cohort of the elderly.

It will also worry Treasurer Josh Frydenberg, who has been commissioned with producing a Budget surplus, no matter the legitimate spending demands the government faces.

The aged care royal commission report will come with a hefty price tag.

There is another royal commission report planned on treatment of the disabled.

The government is also taking a critical look at skills shortages with a review of vocational education opportunities and quality of training.

This sector was not well treated when Julia Gillard was education minister but the time has long passed for the Morrison Government to blame Labor.

The Prime Minister and premiers have agreed to pep up vocational education and training (VET) with Mr Morrison saying, “We all want students, whatever age they are, they could be 21, they could be 61 and going through a career change … to have confidence that that system is going to help them with their future intentions and their future careers.”

He might be able to draw on a report into VET which he commissioned in November last year.

There also now is an inquiry into management of water resources and the Murray-Darling Basin, the domain of the Nationals’ for most of the six years.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission will examine the water market in the Murray-Darling Basin. One reason for this is the savage drought that has hit farmers and pastoralists.

But another is the ability of companies to hoard water as a valuable commodity rather than releasing it for food growing, environmental health or household use.

Another big issue is energy policy — or the absence of one.

There once was a National Energy Guarantee, which went through cabinet a was three times approved by the Liberal party room but could not survive a coal-favouring rump of backbenchers.

The consequence was it was never implemented, Australia’s carbon emissions are rising and the certainty sought by business is being denied.

And while wind farms are being attacked as “satanic”, any guarantee of lower domestic power prices is muted at best.

So there now is another inquiry — into nuclear energy.

Former banking inquiry royal commissioner Kenneth Hayne noted the traffic jam of investigations in a speech given last month but made public recently.

He suggested government’s only concentrated on putting out political “spot fires” rather than long-term matters, which has weakened voter faith.

“Instead, we need to grapple closely with what these calls are telling us about the state of our democratic institutions,” Mr Hayne said.

“Trust in all sorts of institutions, governmental and private, has been damaged or destroyed.”

SOURCEAAP:https://www.news.com.au/national/politics/morrison-government-faces-backlog-of-problems/news-story/7160807f5ee443b6871929d86bfa2049