Jobs 2021: 12 non-tech jobs that will boom in the future of work

When it comes to the future of work, it’s not all about tech related skills and experience. Far from it. We’ll be in serious trouble if those graduating from school or seeking to make some kind of career change right now all only go into tech roles like software development. The planet is not made up of computers. Rather, the roles that will be in demand in the coming years are those that have a strong people element, jobs that involve interacting and responding to other humans; especially within industries that are essential to the growing needs of a changing population, like in aged and health care.

Skills in demand, skills in decline

Skills in demand, skills in decline
We may look back on 2020 as the year when the future of work truly arrived. The question for learning and development professionals is how to take stock of a difficult, tumultuous year and navigate what is ahead. Now, more than ever, the decisions we make around investments will determine how our talent navigates the volatility. A consensus is growing that views skills as the new micro currency for those investments, and we now have a granularity of talent data that enables us to analyze our workforces at levels never before possible.

Read more here: https://www.chieflearningofficer.com/2020/12/15/skills-in-demand-skills-in-decline/

New guide for where future jobs will be

New guide for where future jobs will be

Perhaps unsurprisingly, jobs in health care and social assistance have proved the most resilient occupations during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, a new report by the National Skills Commission has also found education and training, construction and mining are among occupations that have best been able to stand up to the impact of the coronavirus impact.

Read more here: https://au.news.yahoo.com/guide-where-future-jobs-163018236–spt.html

Jobs program driving change

Jobs program driving change
The central paradox of indigenous advancement in Australia and in closing many of the economic, demographic and health disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians is that meaningful participation in the economy is crucial — but for many Indigenous Australians, the resources industry is the biggest (if not the only) part of the economy that exists where they live.