India and Australia further Strengthens their Partnership on Skilling Agenda

India and Australia further Strengthens their Partnership on Skilling Agenda

Ministry of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship(MSDE) and High Commission of Australia holds meeting for Cooperation in Vocational Education and Training. In an endeavor to support Vocational Education and Training (VET) in India and Australia, the Union Minister for Skill Development and Entrepreneurship, Dr. MahendraNath Pandey and Mr. Barry O’Farrell, Australian High Commissioner, today participatedin a virtual meeting to operationalize & implementCooperation in VET to promote development of occupational standards in priority industry sectors.  

Read more here: https://indiaeducationdiary.in/india-and-australia-further-strengthens-their-partnership-on-skilling-agenda/

The five most powerful people in education

The five most powerful people in education

In May, the National Skills Commission came to life as the anchor for reform in the training sector, though there’s a long way to go. The new commissioner has only just been formally appointed, and state-based TAFEs are highly protective. Steven Joyce, the New Zealand-based architect of vocational reform, has spent months pushing heads together.  

Read more here: https://www.afr.com/work-and-careers/education/the-five-most-powerful-people-in-education-20200716-p55cs0

Governments prioritizing “job training” over higher education

Governments prioritizing "job training" over higher education

The basic structure of the common good involves meeting human needs for water, sanitation, power, transport, health and access to the law. Such activities require training, and there is an obvious public interest in providing it. But reducing education to job training is not only a partial or limited view. It is sinister.

Australia’s education system needs to be better attuned to the needs of industry

Australia's education system needs to be better attuned to the needs of industry
Tertiary education must be re-engineered as the consequence of having international students as our universities’ lifeblood has fostered a culture of profit over education, reflected in the lack of insight about how to nurture the next generation of Australians able to meet our future workforce needs.