Falling apprentice numbers concerning for industry

Falling apprentice numbers concerning for industry
Falling apprentice numbers concerning for industry

Despite the government’s relief package with its 50 percent contribution some small business employers can not afford to retain an apprentice in this current crisis. The $1500 a fortnight JobKeeper payment has not yet kicked in for many employers since most had not yet hit the trigger point of a 30 percent fall in turnover.

Apprentice decline due to COVID-19

An estimated 3300 apprentices have lost their jobs nationally due to businesses being forced to lay them off as a result of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.
The result of this drop will be a generation of young people struggling to get a foot in the workforce  and worsening skills shortages as industry struggles to find qualified workers in the future.

Shot in the arm for apprentices as part of governments COVID-19 response

Shot in the arm for apprentices as part of governments COVID-19 response
Scott Morrison will fund $1.3 billion in wage subsidies for apprentices as part of Thursday’s coronavirus economic stimulus package. The Prime Minister, Scot Morrison has pledged $1.3 billion in wage subsidies for apprentices as part of his government’s coronavirus economic stimulus package. According to the PM, 117,000 apprentices would be supported by the federal government to ensure there were few job losses at small firms with 20 or less employees.

Apprenticeships decline impacting on skill shortages

Apprenticeships decline impacting on skill shortages
A shortage of plumbers, carpenters, plasterers and bricklayers is being felt in almost every state and territory in Australia. Industry is crying out for more government funding for training and incentives for employers to take on apprentices blaming lack of subsidies the reason why employers are not offering apprenticeships.

Read more here: https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2020/02/28/decline-apprenticeships/

NZ reforms vocational education and training sector

NZ reforms vocational education and training sector

The Education Amendment Bill has been passed which includes establishing workforce development councils and centres of vocational excellence introducing a new focus for the government on trades and vocational education. Under the bill the New Zealand Institute of Skills and Technology will bring together all 16 polytechnics and institutes of technology to provide, arrange and support vocational education and training across the country.

Read more here:  https://www.nzherald.co.nz/north-island/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503932&objectid=12310214

Indonesia and Australia formalise trade agreement incorporating skills and vocational education

Indonesia and Australia recently ratified the Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (IA-CEPA). The countries have agreed to a skills development package, which includes a skills exchange program and technical assistance to improve institutional capacity building. Australian businesses can now own a majority share in investments in the vocational education and training sector.

Read more here: https://www.aseanbriefing.com/news/indonesia-australia-ratify-ia-cepa-agreement/

Reseach shows economy losing out due to the untapped potential of migrant workers

The study, conducted by the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre, found that 35 per cent of non-English-speaking migrant workers were considered over-qualified for their jobs, compared to 10 per cent of Australian-born employees.  Report author Alan Duncan of Curtin University said improved skills, coupled with better education and training, could add $6 billion to Australia’s economy.

Funding for vocational education and training (VET) at a 10 year low

Mitchell Institute releases new report and sounds VET funding alarm
The Mitchell Institute recently shared the results of the Australian Investment in Education: Vocational Education and Training Report, showing that Vocational Education and Training (VET) funding has reached its lowest level in more than a decade, 
leaving Australia at risk of failing to provide high-quality training for an estimated 45% of new jobs in need of VET qualifications.